Author: Pauline Davey

OATA welcomes a new face to its Board of Directors

The aquatic industry trade body has welcomed three new directors to its Board, following its annual general meeting held in November. Caroline Everett of Anglo Aquatic Plants, Dr Donna Snellgrove of Waltham Research Centre, part of Mars Petcare, and Simon Strode of Tetra will now attend board meetings. The vacancies were created when the trade association said goodbye to three directors – Jane Flaherty of JMC Aquatics, Richard Hale of Berry Ring Aquatics, and Andy Stagg of NT Labs – who have all stood down over the past year. OATA Chief Executive Dominic Whitmee said: “We were sad to...

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What does Access and Benefits Sharing mean for this industry?

Within the ornamental aquatic industry, researchers/scientists, manufacturers and breeders will access material from animals, plants and micro-organisms which is of value both presently and potentially in the future (this is known as a genetic resource). Such material is used in the research and development of animal and plant breeds/strains, food and feeds and derivatives which can be used to develop treatments, so that such users can benefit both commercially and non-commercially (by increased knowledge). On the 12 October 2014, an international agreement came into force called the Nagoya Protocol on Access and Benefits Sharing (ABS). The aim of the...

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OATA hands out Lifetime Achievement Award

23 October 2017 Retired Chief Executive Keith Davenport has been recognised for his work in the aquatics industry by being awarded OATA’s Lifetime Achievement Award. Keith, who spent 25 years at the helm of OATA, was presented the award at the AQUA2017 show dinner by Dr David Pool. Keith was recruited at the beginning of the 90s to help set up and run a new trade association, originally called OFI UK, to tackle a number of big issues facing the industry at that time. Renamed OATA in 1997, he took the organisation from strength to strength, raising standards and...

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How to protect your garden pond against otters

We’ve seen a number of stories about otters raiding garden ponds for fish. Otters are protected by law and it is a criminal offence to capture, injure, kill or deliberately disturb wild otters. However, there are some ways garden pond owners can protect their ponds if they suspect otters are eating their fish. We’ve joined forces with the UK Wild Otter Trust to come up with information on otters and suggest some simple proactive measures that can be taken to help reduce or prevent predation on pond fish. Read our leaflet here What you can do Garden pond fish...

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