Author: wp

Access and benefits sharing EU regulation

The EU is preparing guidance documents to help people understand whether their activities fall within the scope of EU Regulations on compliance measures for users from the Nagoya Protocol on Access to Genetic Resources and Fair and Equitable Sharing of Benefits Arising from their Utilisation in the Union. Three EU guidance documents on issues likely to apply to our industry are in preparation covering: Animal breeding sector Plant breeding sector Food and feed sector So if any of your activities fall within the scope of the new Regulations you will be subject to certain obligations. For our industry we believe this is likely to affect captive-reared species, and possibly manufacturers of fish food who may need to look at the origins of what they put into their foods. This is a very complicated area but in essence anyone intending to ‘utilise’ the genetic resources of an animal or plant (or part of it) imported into the EU from a Party to Nagoya must undertake due diligence. In this context ‘utilisation of genetic resources’ means to conduct research and development on the genetic and/or biochemical composition of genetic resources, including through the application of biotechnology. This could, for example, be for the purpose of changing their traits and/or developing a new variety of animal or plant. The way we interpret this obviously means fish, plants, invertebrates etc that are captive...

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Emails

13 October 2016 We’ve had some difficulties with our emails today which is now being resolved. But if you don’t get a reply within a reasonable time frame please send your email again just in case it got lost in...

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Apple Snails

10 October 2016 Updated information has been released from the Government on Apple Snails. Apple Snails (Pomacea) should not be introduced into or allowed to spread within the EU, which means retailers should not be importing, breeding or selling Apple Snails. When the prohibitions were introduced in 2012 the UK Plant Health Service allowed the sale of existing stocks on the condition that the snails would not be allowed to multiply. As the life expectancy of these snails is between 6 and 18 months all the stock from 2012 should now have died and any current sales or breeding of Apple Snails would be in breach of the legislation. If eggs are seen in captive stock, they should be removed, and frozen before disposal. Under no circumstances should Apple Snails be released into the wild. Further information is available...

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UPDATED: OATA position on CITES meeting

Here is final decisions made at the CITES CoP in South Africa 2016. 10 October 2016 The following position statement has been released by Ornamental Fish International, which attended the CITES meeting in South Africa, following the decision by the EU to withdraw its proposal for Banggai Cardinals to be listed on Appendix II. OFI was also representing OATA at the CITES meeting and we support this position. “The situation for the Banggai Cardinal Fish has been of major concern to OFI for many years, although not necessarily for the same reasons as suggested by CITES CoP17 prop. 46. “We are dealing with a species with a very restricted distribution, exposed to a multitude of threats. In addition to the collection for the ornamental fish trade, which has shown a decreasing trend in later years, these threats include destruction of the macro and micro habitats, due to destructive fishing methods for food fish and selective targeting of the host sea anemones and sea urchins. Use as feeder fish in mariculture of food fish has been reported to be an added threat. “Because of the complexity of the threat factors for the species, we could not agree to CITES Appendix II listing being an effective tool for protecting the species. “Through the unfortunate experience with the listing of the seahorses 14 years ago, we are in no doubt that Indonesia...

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Say goodbye to water hyacinth as EU bans the plant from UK garden ponds

28 July 2016 Popular aquatic plant water hyacinth will soon disappear from UK ponds after the European Commission finally published its list of species of EU wide concern, as part of the Invasive Alien Species Regulation. The list effectively bans long-term sale of water hyacinth in the UK, along with four other aquatic plants and the red-eared slider (terrapin). According to advice issued by DEFRA, retailers and wholesalers have 12 months to clear their shelves of these species. Customers with water hyacinth in their ponds do not have to remove it but must not let it spread elsewhere while those with the affected terrapin species must ensure they do not breed and cannot pass them on to other people. “We appreciate this will be very frustrating for many of our members. We made the case continuously that water hyacinth cannot survive UK winters so effectively all plants in ponds at the moment will naturally die out. Unless shops have a contract with a wholesaler to supply for next year, customers will not be able to replace this popular pond plant next season,” explained OATA’s Chief Executive Dominic Whitmee. “It’s very disappointing that despite my predecessor Keith’s concerted efforts the European Commission failed to recognise the scientific evidence and the economic impacts on legitimate businesses in the UK where there is clearly no threat of invasion from water hyacinth, especially...

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